Malaga travel guide

Malaga is a sea side city and the capital town of the Andalusia province. It is the second-most populous city in Andalusia after Seville and the sixth most populous in Spain. If you are looking for a holiday destination combined with sea, culture and a lively atmosphere, you'll won't be bored in Malaga. Malaga has shaken off its reputation as being merely the gateway to the Costa del Sol. It is just a step away from many beautiful places, therefore if you are here more than just a weekend, consider hiring a car and do a road trip around beautiful Andalusia.

Malaga travel guide

Malaga travel guide

WHAT TO DO & SEE?

1. Malaga Cathedral
The Cathedral of Málaga is a Roman Catholic church in the city of Málaga in Andalusia in southern Spain. It is in the Renaissance architectural tradition. The cathedral is located within the limits defined by a now missing portion of the medieval Moorish walls, the remains of which surround the nearby Alcazaba and the Castle of Gibralfaro. It was constructed between 1528 and 1782, following the plans drawn by Diego de Siloe; its interior is also in Renaissance style. You can purchase your ticket to visit the cathedral online or on side for € 6.00 (adult general).

                                Malaga travel guide

Malaga travel guide

2. Alcazaba
The Alcazama of Malaga is the citadel built by Muslim rulers of Malaga in the 11th century as Al-Qasba (fortress) overlooking the sea for any threats. It is the best-preserved alcazaba in Spain. Adjacent to the entrance of the Alcazaba are remnants of a Roman theatre dating to the 1st century BC, which are undergoing restoration.  You can purchase a ticket to visit Alcazaba for €3.50 or purchase a combined ticket to visit Alcazaba and Gibralfaro for 5.50 Euros. 

                         Malaga travel guide

Malaga travel guide

Malaga travel guide

Malaga travel guide

3. Gibralfaro
Mount Gibralfaro, Spanish: Monte Gibralfaro, is a hill located in Málaga in southeast Spain. It is a 130 m high foothill of the Montes de Málaga, part of the Cordillera Penibética. You'll get a perfect view on Malaga from here. You'll need to walk up hill to get there, so make sure to bring a bottle of water with you.

4. Teatro Romano de Malaga
The Roman Theatre in Málaga (RTM) is located on the west slope of the Alcazaba hill. Built during the reign of Augustus.

Malaga travel guide

Malaga travel guide

5. Museo Picasso
The Museo Picasso Málaga is a museum in Málaga, Andalusia, Spain, the city where artist Pablo Ruiz Picasso was born. It opened in 2003 in the Buenavista Palace, and has 285 works donated by members of Picasso's family. You can visit the museum for € 8-12. Did you also know that they have free admission for all visitors every Sunday the last two opening hours (up to 30 minutes before closing time), Day of Andalusia (28 February), International Museum Day (18 May) and World Tourism Day (27 September).

6. Playa de Malagueta 
The province of Malaga gives its visitors the opportunity to enjoy themselves in extraordinary hideouts. One of the best ways of relaxing is to spend the whole day on one of its fabulous sandy beaches, such as Playa de la Malagueta which is Málaga's most famous urban beach.

7. Soho
Soho Málaga, a lively alternative neighborhood is a place you can't miss. Like London or NYC, Soho neighborhood is an urban artsy buzzing district. Soho district is a cultural and commercial area located close to the central part of the city, between the Port and Alameda Principal. You can easily reach it from the city center on foot (around 15 mins) or by bus. What is interesting about Soho Málaga is that its fame as the street art district was actually a result of a public initiative, MAUS project (Málaga Arte Urbano Soho). The aim of the project was revitalization of the previously misused and neglected district. Now you can admire beautiful mural art as a life art gallery on the streets. Yu can check a map by MUAS to not miss a mural art.

8. Plaza de la Constitucion
Plaza de la Constitución is a public square in the city center of Málaga. You can admire the beautiful fountain and Andalusia architecture around and enjoy the vibrant surrounding packed with shops, bars and restaurants.

Malaga travel guide

Malaga travel guide

9. Embalse del Limonero
Just outside of Malaga city centre you can enjoy a beautifuk nature of The Limonero reservoir. The reservoirs of Malaga are ideal in any season of the year, as we can enjoy multiple activities such as hiking, cycling or cooling off during the summer.

20. Jardin Botanico 
The Jardín Botánico Histórico La Concepción is an English landscape garden with over one hundred and fifty years of history. It is located at the northern entrance of the Spanish city of Málaga. This garden is one of the few gardens with subtropical plants that exist in Europe.

Malaga travel guide


WHERE TO EAT & DRINK?

1. Mercado Central
The Mercado de Atarazanas is one of the buildings which best represent the architecture of the nineteenth century in Malaga. Come here to enjoy tapas or buy local food. 

2. Casa Aranda
Casa Aranda is one of the longest standing cafes in Malaga, doing business in this same street since 1932, famous for their chocolate and churros. 

3. Mia Coffee House
Tucked away in a cute little square of the old city of Malaga is Mia Coffee Shop, one of a growing number of specialty cafes. A great place to grab your coffee and handmade cakes.

4. Chiringuito El Cachalote
Laid-back beachfront restaurant featuring seafood dishes, outdoor seating & hammocks. 

5. Casa Lola
There’s a huge range of tapas on offer, including northern-style pintxos (small snacks), classics such as patatas bravas (spicy potatoes) and Casa Lola’s house recipes. 

Malaga travel guide

Malaga travel guide

Malaga travel guide

Malaga travel guide